Mappy diversion: the 40th parallel, Ana Ng's Peruvian lover, and globe-spanning sandwiches

I'm back from a trip almost halfway around the world in terms of longitude, but a pretty short hop in latitude. A weather diversion on the way over brought me to Oklahoma City airport, what would have been my second time ever setting foot on Oklahoma soil, but as you may have the misfortune to know, a "diversion" means you don't get off the plane, at least not until the passenger bill of rights two hour limit expires.

That's the long way around to say, I thought perhaps I was near the 40th parallel, the subject of the estimable Bruce Myren's photo project and kickstarter campaign, which is widgetized at right. I was off by at least five degrees of latitude, which shows my level of familiarity with the middle of this country.

Which brings us back to maps. (Bet you didn't see that coming) Here's another clip from the Great Circle Mapper, which I touted some time ago. They've made some spiffy improvements. I often think of flights to Asia from the central USA as going "over the pole" but it seems that this one didn't even break the arctic circle. Of course, the great circles mapped are the most direct routes, not necessarily the actual flight paths.

That's a good 15,000 miles and will likely leave me soulless for almost two weeks. Thoughts of global mapping also bring me back to a vintage limeduck post where I wondered about the places alluded to in TMBG's Ana Ng:

Make a hole with a gun perpendicular
To the name of this town in a desktop globe
Exit wound in a foreign nation
Showing the home of the one this was written for

These places, I've learned, are called antipodes, and it turns out that it's pretty unlikely that any town in the continental USA has a dry land antipode. If we assume that Ana Ng is in Vietnam, then the song's narrator could be in Peru. Locating Ana in various other parts of Asia can put the singer in other parts of South America, but with more than 2/3 the globe covered in water, there just aren't that many inhabitable antipodes. So you don't have to shoot your globe. Kudos to the smarties at Free Map Tools and Antipode Map for making this sort of cutting-edge research so easy, and also to the ever-alert Strange Maps blog.

In case anybody is still reading, I've got to bring up one more map-related wonder, the Earth Sandwich. According to Ze Frank, the creator (discoverer?) of the Earth Sandwich, "An EARTH SANDWICH is created when two slices of bread are simultaneously placed on opposite sides of the EARTH." An excellent bookend to TMBG's ballistic approach to antipodes, I think. If you happen to be reading this on a boat in the Indian Ocean Southwest of Australia and have bread and cheese, I propose we create the first Earth Grilled Cheese Sandwich.

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